Clinging (SN 12.52)

Saṃyutta Nikaya 12.52
PTS: S ii 84 CDB i 589
Upādāna Sutta
(Clinging)

At Sāvatthī.

“Bhikkhus, when one dwells attending to the gratification in things that can be clung to, craving increases. With craving as condition, clinging arises; with clinging as condition, becoming; with becoming as condition, birth; with birth as condition, aging-and-death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair arise.

“Thus there is the arising of this whole mass of suffering.

“Suppose, bhikkhus, a great bonfire was burning, consuming ten, twenty, thirty, or forty loads of wood, and a man would cast dry grass, dry cow dung, and dry wood into it from time to time. Thus, sustained by that material, fueled by it, that great bonfire would burn for a very long time. So, too, when one dwells attending to the gratification in things that can be clung to, craving increases. With craving as condition, clinging arises; with clinging as condition, becoming; with becoming as condition, birth; with birth as condition, aging-and-death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair arise.

“Thus there is the arising of this whole mass of suffering.

“Bhikkhus, when one dwells attending to the danger in things that can be clung to, craving decreases. With the cessation of craving, there is the cessation of clinging; with the cessation of clinging, there is the cessation of becoming; with the cessation of becoming, there is the cessation of birth; with the cessation of birth, there is the cessation of aging-and-death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair.

“Thus there is the cessation of this whole mass of suffering.

“Suppose, bhikkhus, a great bonfire was burning, consuming ten, twenty, thirty, or forty loads of wood, and a man would not cast dry grass, dry cow dung, or dry wood into it from time to time. Thus, when the former supply of fuel is exhausted, that great bonfire, not being fed with any more fuel, lacking sustenance, would be extinguished. So, too, when one lives contemplating the danger in things that can be clung to, craving decreases. With the cessation of craving, there is the cessation of clinging; with the cessation of clinging, there is the cessation of becoming; with the cessation of becoming, there is the cessation of birth; with the cessation of birth, there is the cessation of aging-and-death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief and despair.

“Thus there is the cessation of this whole mass of suffering.”

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